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Those of you who have read my diaries long enough know about the struggles I've had looking for work. Well, a couple weeks ago, I simply quit looking. Instead, I volunteer for my county doing what I had done as a paid intern in the hopes that the higher ups will find the budget to hire me, unlikely as that seems, but hey, I have to do something to maintain my sanity.

I'll go more into the reasons why I stopped looking below the squiggly.

First of all, the private sector where I live is a ghost town. In over a year that I've spent looking for jobs, I've had a few interviews here and there, but no callbacks whatsoever. I've done everything I can to find a job, and where I volunteer is probably the closest I've ever gotten to obtaining one.

Vocational Rehabilitation and similar services in my county barely function due to the continuous theft by the cronies who refer to themselves as 'elected' officials, and colleges and other institutions are even worse.

Just before I graduated, a job fair was held where I went to school, and what disgusted me the most is that not a single table had companies or people hiring for what I or most folks there had trained for. What I did see was companies like Target, McDonalds and Chick Fil-A. Sure, there were a couple of tech companies, but they wanted experienced programmers with master's degrees.

Worst of all was that the so-called career specialists were telling me I had to be 'open minded'. They may as well have said 'Just take what you can get and shut the fuck up', because that's exactly what I hear when people tell me to be open minded.

As some of you know, I'm working on getting my license, since it's the only way anything I do will be taken seriously by employers, or so it seems. It's funny how all these organizations pay lip service to giving us a chance to be productive citizens, and yet when it comes to doing the deed, nothing materializes.

This is why sometimes I feel so resentful and angry, as do so many other people in similar situations. It's not that we're unwilling to do the work expected of us. It's the fact that top-heavy employers deny us the chance. Despite the pretty speeches about how people should get educated or about how folks with disabilities manage to rise despite our hardships, it doesn't mean shit in the real world where the only thing that matters is how much profits a business makes every quarter.

So in closing, I only have this to say: We work hard. We take our punishment. We sacrifice. We do everything we can to prepare ourselves to be self sufficient, so how about giving us a chance for once, instead of just talking about it?

See you around,

Homer

Originally posted to The Aspie Corner on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 11:36 AM PST.

Also republished by Unemployment Chronicles.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (28+ / 0-)

    I write a series called 'My Life as an Aspie', documenting my experiences before and after my A.S. diagnosis as a way to help fellow Aspies and parents of Aspies and spread awareness. If I help just one person by doing this, then I've served a purpose.

    by Homer177 on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 11:36:45 AM PST

  •  well I am 60 and disabled and therefore (16+ / 0-)

    radioactive as far as employment goes so I am working on learning about appraising as a possibility to setting up a small online antique business (with millions other) in the future as I learn.  
    Well I have managed various business enterprises over the years, from a medical clinic to a farm, building the clinic up to 15 employees when we started with 2 and increasing the farm from 150 acres to 1000 acres.  It all depends on having an eye for what other people will want and then buying it for less than 50% of what you can sell it for.

    Just mentioning this as entrepreneurship is always an option even if it is just a supplement to your income and not the whole enchilada

  •  Afraid I know your story well. (16+ / 0-)

    By and large, I could have written your diary.

    I'm old enough I can assure you, first-hand, that the job market has had a long time to get this bad. Yes, we're in a crisis, but we've had plenty of build-up. Decades. Each period of "recovery" has left fewer living-wage jobs than what existed in the "good times" before. It has been an inexorable pattern since the 1980s, at least.

    Always, in the job-search seminars, we were drilled on being "flexible" and "proactive," as if this was supposed to compensate for a withering job market no policy seemed to help beyond band-aids, if that. What nobody ever wants to discuss, is that if you're long-term unemployed, the real problem is not with your "attitude." It's with the economy.

    I know times are hard. They're hard for many others, too. Chin up, and godspeed.

    It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

    by karmsy on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 12:40:20 PM PST

    •  Yup..back in the 80s... (10+ / 0-)

      Saint Ronald made wholesale theft perfectly fine when he stopped enforcing anti-trust laws. It actually got worse under Clinton because he allowed the Glass Steagall act to expire and allowed NAFTA to become the law of the land.

      I write a series called 'My Life as an Aspie', documenting my experiences before and after my A.S. diagnosis as a way to help fellow Aspies and parents of Aspies and spread awareness. If I help just one person by doing this, then I've served a purpose.

      by Homer177 on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 01:17:31 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  The politicians don't have our interests (9+ / 0-)

        at heart, and never did. They are funded by the corporations, and that's who they serve.

        Only a true uprising by the grassroots will change our course.

        It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

        by karmsy on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 02:35:29 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  That's just it. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          karmsy

          There have been many grassroots movements over the years. Some have been successful, but most are snuffed out by the feds before they gain any sort of traction.

          Occupy Wall Street is a perfect example of that. The cops routinely kicked the shit out of peaceful protestors.

          The only time protests are ever supported is when they support and defend the rich and powerful, i.e. the Tea Party.

          The only other group today that has seen any measure of success is Anonymous. I'd love to see them take on more liberal causes.

          I write a series called 'My Life as an Aspie', documenting my experiences before and after my A.S. diagnosis as a way to help fellow Aspies and parents of Aspies and spread awareness. If I help just one person by doing this, then I've served a purpose.

          by Homer177 on Sun Feb 17, 2013 at 10:33:03 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I want to tell you about Occupy. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Homer177

            Yes, I am one of that scraggling "generation" born in the demographic trough between the end of the Baby Boom and the start of the Millennial Boom (which first hit about 1980 or so). The reason this is important, is that I had to come of age in the 1980s. I saw first-hand, and had my attitudes formed, in that miserable decade of the Reagan Revolution, before the internet. Shadowy forces behind-the-scenes were working all-out to reverse the humanist-democratic gains of earlier decades. I saw the glorification of rigid fundamentalist religion. I saw narcissistic self-help movements that disparaged public involvement as "trying to save the world" (when you were supposed to be "working on yourself.") I saw the flowering of "feminism" based on doing-everything-perfectly. I saw "downsizing" become a word in the lexicon. I thought this was all there was, and ever could be in this world. I basically thought that for a long time.

            Then along came uprisings in Wisconsin, following Walker's election and crackdown. Along came Occupy. For the first time in my life, I saw widespread, self-assured grassroots progressive activism. I heard Mario Savio's "Throw Your Body on the Gears" speech from the 1960s Free Speech movement in Berkeley repeated, not ironically, but in earnest.

            I re-envisioned society and its potential.

            Doubtless, there were many others these movements affected just as they affected me. In that measure, Occupy succeeded.

            It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

            by karmsy on Sun Feb 17, 2013 at 12:41:36 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Occupy deserves a lot of credit in that respect. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              karmsy

              They did and still are doing what most people are afraid to do. They also  need to do for the Democrats what the Tea Party did for the Republicans at the local level though.

              I also think we need to push our country toward a civilian economy rather than a military one. That will certainly be a tough nut to crack because we've almost always been at war with someone.

              I write a series called 'My Life as an Aspie', documenting my experiences before and after my A.S. diagnosis as a way to help fellow Aspies and parents of Aspies and spread awareness. If I help just one person by doing this, then I've served a purpose.

              by Homer177 on Sun Feb 17, 2013 at 04:19:40 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  True, Democrats, being doers, often make happen (8+ / 0-)

        what Republicans claim to try and fail. Democrats take some pride in saying, "see, this is how it's done." So, Clinton/Gore managed "welfare reform" which employed women to look after other women's children while somebody else was watching their own. All the women with children were then employed. Hardly anyone asked whether what they were doing was worth while, or whether the children were better off.
        People getting paid does have the advantage of being able to better keep track of them. And bureaucrats are happy when they have something to put in their files.

        As a professional volunteer for over forty years, let me warn you that managers like to manipulate, regardless of whether the worker is getting paid. I suspect that manipulation, like accumulation, is liable to becoming obsessive.

        We organize governments to deliver services and prevent abuse.

        by hannah on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 02:36:48 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yeah, I worry about that. (4+ / 0-)

          I'm basically the 'top volunteer' where I'm at, considering I've digitized nearly half of all their hard copy watershed data from the last 15 years.

          They know that when it comes to looking for work I'm stuck between a rock and a hard place. I'm not struggling financially, but still...

          I write a series called 'My Life as an Aspie', documenting my experiences before and after my A.S. diagnosis as a way to help fellow Aspies and parents of Aspies and spread awareness. If I help just one person by doing this, then I've served a purpose.

          by Homer177 on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 04:29:20 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

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