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Fri Apr 09, 2010 at 10:34 PM PDT

Future sock puppet

by lh114

I have to give up this ID. It's complex, but I got busted. The joy, and sometimes ire here, is in part, in the anonymity of this place. You get to have discussions here that are unique.
I set up a new ID (with obviously a later user ID number)
I'm distressed to have to do this, but I feel I have no choice.
I know this is a very short diary, but I love being here and changing my ID is very upsetting to me.
I need to say goodbye as the original me.
Hope to see you in my new incarnation.
I hate this.
Wish I could stay me. Will show up on Mojo Friday feeling like an alien.
Take care.
Be kind to us newbies.
xo
-lh114

Discuss

 I had a fair amount of passive experience with immigration law in the '80s. My understanding from that time, is no native-born American citizen can ever have dual citizenship (unless your parents change your citizenship and you later return to the US.)
  If you are born in another country, you can become an American without renouncing your old passport; however, if you are a native-born American and you become a citizen of another country you must renounce your American citizenship.

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 I'm a doctor not an IT person but I believe an almost infinite number of technical problems are possible and I know I understand very few of them. With that said, I have a very hard time logging on to this site. Despite it being on my tool bar, it is the only site I have to type in by hand and then wait for, almost every time.
 This chronic and vaguely annoying personal experience has kept John McCain's Bill "The internet Fredom Act of 2009" in the forefront of my mind, because if this is my situation now, I can't imagine what it will be like were his bill to be passed.
 
    This is not about my peculiar experience I have a good Mac and I don't care about my internet issues.
 I just don't want McCain's bill to pass under the radar and get through while other things are grabbing headlines.

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Fri Dec 04, 2009 at 10:13 AM PST

Domestic Violence as a Joke?

by lh114

This will be brief.  
My basic understanding of the Tiger Woods story is that his neighbor called 911 because he was lying on the ground outside his car immobile and that his back car window was smashed in by his wife with a golf club. The belief is that he had cuts and bruises on his face most likely inflicted by his wife in the context of a dispute after she found out he was having one (or more affairs.) He was obviously in bad shape as he had to go to the hospital.
 Let me point out that if he had done this to her he would be in jail awaiting trail and headed for prison.
  Am I the only person who thinks that this level of violence - that included a weapon, is unacceptable coming from a man OR a woman.
 

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Fri Nov 20, 2009 at 06:40 AM PST

Joe Lieberman's wife?

by lh114

 Let me say up front that every time I see Joe on television, he makes my skin crawl. His hypocritical, creepy, soft spoken ooze is more than I can usually bare.
  Ok, with that said, I know he is the Senator from Connecticut and yes, Connecticut has more insurance companies than most other states but how about this from wiki about Joe's wife:

Since March 2005, Hadassah Lieberman has worked for Hill & Knowlton, a lobbying firm based in New York City, as a senior counselor in its health and pharmaceuticals practice. She has held senior positions at the Hospital of Saint Raphael in New Haven, the American Committee for Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials-International (APCO), Pfizer, National Research Council, Hoffmann-La Roche, and Lehman Brothers.

Hill & Knowlton represents Glaxosmithkline.

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  I was just watching congressman Brown on the ED Show telling people they should get treatment for major depressive disorder by going to the Emergency Room.
  People who are suicidal should go to the emergency room; however, I think it is important that everyone know about 1-800-LIFENET. Obviously, he didn't.

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Wed Jul 01, 2009 at 07:13 AM PDT

Tylenol may finally get a warning label

by lh114

I just saw the title "FDA may put restrictions on TYLENOL... " on Drudge report
 This is the link from Drudge
This is truly great news.
I work as a psychiatrist. most of my patients are young females and many have had history of suicide attempts.
Not all of these attempts were meant to be life ending. There are many reasons people take overdoses of pills.
  Unfortunately, because of Tylenol's marketing, most young women think the safest thing to overdose with is one of the deadliest - Tylenol.

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The reason spending money on healthcare saves money, is by insuring the uninsured, hospitals and physician would be getting paid close to 100% on their billing. Presently, (from the last figures I was given by a few surgeon) they get about 60% back. If you were only paid for 60% for the time you worked and were only reimbursed 60% for the resources you used at work you would be charging more and more as well.
The surgeon can not increase his/her fee because it is medicare/medicaid capped. It is the hospital that can increase prices for the use of the resources (the Operating room, the equipment, all of those disposable kits, the cost of the time of the salaried staff)
(I am a physician not a journalist and my numbers come from conversations with other physicians in hospitals in the New York area. They are not statistics from studies.)
Beyond that, someone needs to face the pharmaceutical companies in this debate. All other developed countries put caps on prescription medication prices. As we don't do this, pharmaceutical companies get the greatest return on their investment by charging the most to Americans specifically. (This is how you get anti-nausea medications that are a $100 a pill.)
Finally, a discussion on end of life issues has to begin. This is a subject for another diary.

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From Nate Silver at 538 at the end of April:

Although many people regard torture as a moral absolute, for others (perhaps most others) it is more of a sliding scale: certain types of torture may be permissible against certain types of persons in certain -- presumably fairly extraordinary -- circumstances. A Pew poll released last week, for example, has 15 percent of Americans saying torture is "often justified" against terrorism suspects and 25 percent saying it is "never justified". The majority of 56 percent are somewhere in the middle, saying torture is "sometimes justified" (34 percent) or "rarely justified" (22 percent).

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I remember this.
 I can't embed the clip but I can put in the link.
Back in 1998 John Miller, a former crime reporter for NBC news, later a 20/20 correspondent and now I believe an FBI official, interviewed Osama Bin Laden for ABC news. At that time, Bin Laden threatened a series of attacks. The interview (which was on ABC but I can not find on the web in it's entirety) shows Bin Laden giving a series of threats against civilians in the US.
At that time, Bin Laden was in Afghanistan. This was 4 months before Clinton bombed Bin Laden in the Sudan.

  Ok, so this is a guy Clinton bombed in the Sudan in retaliation for the bombings of the embassies in Kenya and Tansania.
  Just before those embassy bombings (4 months before to be precise) John Miller interviewed bin Laden on video tape. Multiple US casualties and civilian casualties were threatened by Bin Laden in his planned Al Qaeda war against the US. How can Cheney claim "little was known" about this organization?

Here is the link to Charlie Rose interviewing John Miller in 2002 about his book on the subject.
The charlie rose interview

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For those who don't do this regularly or have had to deal with it, DNR/DNI stands for "do not resuscitate/do not intubate." They are some of the primary issues of treatment addressed in advance directives.
People had been telling me I should watch the TV show "HOUSE." They said it was well written and the medicine is good.
 So tonight I tried to watch it. The whole thing was about a guy with an unknown paralysis and House (the main character) decides to intubate the guy against his "directives."
The whole show essentially represented the entire issue of DNR/DNI incorrectly and as shown in the episode would make anyone terrified to ever sign a DNR order.
Despite the feel-good ending, I felt like I was watching evil propaganda.

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Jonathan Swift's tombstone reads in latin "here lies Jonathan Swift... where savage indignation can not lacerate the heart."

I'm putting this out there only because for the past week we have been listening to, and hearing about the modern patron saint of "savage indignation" - Rush Limbaugh.

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